Neal Augenstein

Posts Tagged ‘mojo’

5 years in: How #iphonereporting has succeeded, failed

In Uncategorized on February 21, 2015 at 3:53 pm

apps

Here’s the introduction to an essay I’ve contributed to next month’s MoJoCon. An e-book containing essays from all the presenters will be provided to all who join us in Ireland.

This past February marked 5 years since I decided to try to do all my field reporting with mobile devices.

So far, so good.

Many aspects of #iphonereporting have changed between 2010 and 2015 — some for better, some for worse..

As I prepare for the RTE International Mobile Journalism Conference, March 27-28, in Dublin, one clear change is the growing number of journalists utilizing, or at least curious about, using mobile devices for creating content in the field.

Many reporters who still use legacy TV or radio gear for their broadcast packages are supplementing those reports with content created on mobile.

Sadly, it’s become clear that few app developers believe there’s a healthy enough market to create apps specifically for journalists.

While “apps designed for journalists” are becoming fewer and fewer, storytelling opportunities are increasing because of the influx and improvements of general interest apps like Twitter and Instagram.

These and other apps harness the power of the phone’s camera and audio, in intuitive ways that make it easy for anyone to record, edit, and share content.

In my opinion, the biggest opportunity (and challenge) for journalists is to embrace the notion that “old school news packages” are no longer the only way to reach your audience, and that there are now more, and easier storytelling avenues.

A well-crafted report, created on these new storytelling apps and shared through social media, may seem like an extra burden and waste of time for a radio or television reporter, yet I’d suggest it’s a new and valuable way to connect with, and expand your audience.

 

Talking #iphonereporting with AARP

In Uncategorized on April 26, 2014 at 9:57 am

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Had a fabulous #iphonereporting training session with a couple dozen members of AARP‘s social media and TV teams, with lots of how-tos, and discussion about content that can be generated on a mobile device.

Click on this Storify to see what we talked about.

Here’s a phone, go be a reporter

In Uncategorized on March 30, 2014 at 4:48 pm

It sounds ridiculous, and it is.

Far too many news organizations — most notably newspapers — have tossed smartphones to trained journalists, and expected them to assume new responsibilities, and immediately deliver the same quality content they did on traditional gear.

I consider that journalistic malpractice.

While news managers have noticed #iphonereporting can deliver professional audio, video, photography, text, and social media far cheaper than on legacy gear, few empower their employees with strategies, tools, and freedom to create.

Consider the award-winning photojournalists and print reporters who have been told they are expected to suddenly execute their perfected craft on a tiny consumer-grade device.

Concerns about quality are well-founded — it is easy to produce junky content on a smartphone.

Yet, with some creative thinking and consideration about what smartphones do and don’t do well, it is possible (and fun) to tell beautifully-produced stories.

Reporting on mobile devices isn’t better or worse than “the way we’ve always done it” — it’s another way to inform and entertain.

The phone is a tool. That’s it.

A photojournalist’s trained eye and years of experience in framing shots and knowledge of lighting, pacing, and visual storytelling is going to produce a more polished nuanced report than a would-be reporter armed only with an iPhone and apps.

A radio reporter who knows how to use natural sound to bring a listener to the scene is going to be better-equipped than a person who is presented with a phone and some apps, and told “go be a reporter.”

To my way of thinking, the most exciting aspect of #iphonereporting is the freedom to tell stories in the manner best-suited for the story.

Sometimes what’s happening is best portrayed by a reporter and newsmaker. Or, just the newsmaker’s voice. Or a montage of photos with natural sound. Or a series of short videos. Or a single photo.

Allowing journalists the freedom to tell stories in unconventional, and still-to-be-discovered ways is the most empowering and smartest thing a news manager can do to help newsrooms transition to #iphonereporting.

Let me know if you have any questions.

Mobile, yes. Video, no.

In Uncategorized on August 15, 2013 at 12:36 am

Mobile is the future.

Everyone loves video.

Yet, video isn’t the answer on mobile.

Maybe I’m wrong, but I don’t think so.

The problem with video: it’s not easily consumed on a tiny screen, and smartphone users aren’t willing to just sit and stare.

A recent marketing study by Experian shows users spend less than 1% of their time watching video.

And who can blame them? There are so many other tasks smartphone users want to try to fit in while grabbing a cup of coffee, waiting for a bus, or stopped at a traffic light.

Sure, there’s time to consume a 6-second Vine, or even a 15-second Instagram video, but a person rushing to check email, post on social media, and surf the web doesn’t have the inclination to concentrate on something that requires two senses, as watching and listening to a video does.

I contend a well-produced audio feature, is far better content for a smartphone or tablet.

ultimatetweet

A few months ago, I detailed the Ultimate Tweet, which lets a user simultaneously listen to an audio feature while viewing a photo montage.

My premise – when producing content for mobile, audio is better than video – does have some potential drawbacks:

  1. It’s more time-consuming to edit, write, voice, mix a longform audio feature than to shoot a Vine or Instagram video.
  2. Audio production is becoming a lost art, as fewer would-be journalists choose radio, in large part because of low salaries.
  3. The perception video is a better storytelling method than audio.

Granted, I enjoy consuming video on my iPhone as much as the next person, and there are times ‘moving pictures’ are the best way to tell a story.

My suggestion:  consider how users will receive your content, and choose the best tools for telling the story creatively.

Twitter chat on #iphonereporting

In Uncategorized on July 10, 2013 at 8:29 am

Participated in a great Twitter chat hosted by PBS MediaShift, sharing tips and strategies on #iphonereporting.

Click here to see the Twitter chat

Let me know if you have any follow-ups!