Neal Augenstein

Posts Tagged ‘iphone’

Amazon Fire records audio better than iPhone 5

In Uncategorized on July 29, 2014 at 5:42 pm

 

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The new Amazon Fire isn’t ready to replace the Apple iPhone in my #iphonereporting bag of tricks, but audio recorded in the built-in microphone of the Fire surpasses the iPhone 5.

In a basic A-B test, the Fire sounds richer than the iPhone.

The Fire does not have a built-in audio recording app (like VoiceMemo for iPhone) so I used the free Easy Voice Recorder app on the Fire and Voddio on the iPhone.

 

The Amazon Fire is only available on AT&T, which provided me a device to test.

Earlier, I found the Samsung S5 sounds better than the iPhone, and I’d give the edge to the S5 over Fire, too.

Unfortunately, since I still haven’t found an intuitive Android multi-track editing app for Fire’s operating system it would be difficult to do a fully-produced report in the field.

Let me know what you think.

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Adding Google Glass to #iphonereporting

In Uncategorized on December 13, 2013 at 11:30 pm

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Today was my first attempt at combining Google Glass with #iphonereporting.

WTOP purchased Glass a month ago, and I’ve been experimenting with it in the newsroom.

To be honest, I’ve been disappointed with the quality of the audio that’s recorded in videos shot with Glass.

While the video images are nice, my narrations have been distorted, and audio of anyone I’m holding a conversation with is almost inaudible.

To conduct an interview, it was clear I would have to record the audio on another device and sync it with the video.

This first video contains audio recorded on Glass. It’s tinny, distorted, and wind-affected.

This second video contains audio recorded on iPhone in VoiceMemo, and synced in post-production. In my opinion, it’s superior to audio recorded on Glass.

First impression: This is an awful lot of work to complete a basic reporter task. Even if something is technologically possible, if you end up doing MORE work than before, it’s hardly worth it.

I’m hoping Glass developers have improvements in audio hardware, software, and user experience on their radar.

Instagram video tutorial

In Uncategorized on June 20, 2013 at 8:08 pm

Vine’s got some major competition.

Instagram can now shoot 15 seconds of video, compared with Vine’s 6. You can choose one of 13 filters, select a cover frame, and share easily.

I’ve been pretty outspoken that while Vine and Instagram are capable of easy, fun, and in some cases very artistic videos, there are better alternatives for #iphonereporting.

Unless you’re just shooting and posting, shooting and posting, shooting and posting, editing counts — and you can’t do much of it on Vine or Instagram.

In Instagram you can delete your most recent snippet, Vine has no editing.

In a real news situation, I’d likely shoot with the built-in camera, edit in Voddio, upload to YouTube, and tweet it.

Still, there is something to be said for fun.

The Ultimate Tweet

In Uncategorized on April 2, 2013 at 8:43 pm

Typing 140 characters and adding a link or photo is so 2010.

Too many news organizations merely toss web or broadcast content in a tweet.

Here’s an example of content created on mobile for mobile.

Silence is golden. And embarrassing.

In Uncategorized on July 5, 2011 at 11:01 am

It’s happened to every reporter — you attempt to play back a recorded interview, and have the horrible realization you failed to capture the audio.

Here’s how to avoid that moment of anger, frustration, and shame if you’re reporting on your iPhone.

First, in Settings, turn ON Airplane Mode, which will prevent your phone from ringing during your recorded interview.

Once you begin recording audio, you can lock your iPhone in Record On by doing something that seems counterintuitive — touching the On-Off button on the top of the iPhone.

Your screen will actually go dark, and you’ll likely think “oh no, I turned off my phone.”

Yet, when you touch the Home button to ‘revive’ your phone, you’ll see your audio app has continued to run in the background while the screen was dark and your audio has been safely recorded.

So simple, yet so important.

Untether from the past

In Uncategorized on July 2, 2011 at 6:01 pm

Declaring independence — from laptops, bags full of cumbersome radio broadcast gear, and perhaps most important, ‘the way it’s always been done.’

iPhone Reporting provides liberty, for those forward-thinkers willing to embrace both the benefits and challenges it poses. Comparison to work produced by journalists using full-size and function gear is inevitable and helpful, but is often comparing apples to oranges.

I estimate the audio quality of the built-in microphone of the iPhone4 to be 92-percent as good as that recorded with my Shure SM63 into a Marantz PMD620.

While some might argue “the listener will notice the difference,” I assure you a well-produced iPhone Reporting wrap, including your voice track, newsmakers, and natural sound will be almost aurally identical to the report filed by a journalist carrying traditional gear.

Yet, the iPhone Reporter can also provide cropped photos, edited video, and social networking — without having to find, set-up, boot-up, and dub from another device.

Publisher and broadcast media mogul Walter Annenberg once said “I cannot compromise or inhibit my independence.”

I think he’d agree compromise as a way of achieving independence is a goal worth working toward.